RAIN DROPS INTO AN AREA WHERE THERE ARE NO CLOUDS

The 14 curators of the sea project spent two years researching what southeast asian artists have done from 1980 to now

“We’ve been focusing on western art for quite some time and I think now it’s time for us to look at what has been going on in the region”, Fumio Nanjo, the Director of Mori Art Museum explains the idea and intention behind SUNSHOWER: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now, a large-scale exhibition that took place in the spaces of Mori Art Museum and The National Art Center in Tokyo from the 5th of July to the 23rd of October 2017. The word “Sunshower,” which refers to the time when “rain falls from clear skies,” was chosen as the exhibition’s name for it’s a common natural phenomenon in the Southeast Asian region where the climate is just as unpredictable and erratic as the politics and economy. As it turned out, the name served well as the backdrop for several artworks in this “tropical” exhibition, especially the elephant sculpture titled Sunshower, 2017 by Chaisiri Jiwarangsan and Apichatpong Weerasethakul hung at the entrance of Mori Art Museum, creating a shadow that obscures the ground that viewers walk past as they enter the show.

SUNSHOWER was put together by the 14 members of the curatorial team (10 of them are Japanese) that consists of curators from Mori Art Museum and The National Art Center Tokyo with Vera Mey, one of the founders of SOUTHEAST OF NOW from Singapore, Indonesian curator, Grace Samboh, and independent artist and curator Ong Jo-Lene and Merv Espina, being the Southeast Asian reinforcement. It took the team two and a half years to develop the SEA PROJECT, which is a study that revolves around the art of Southeast Asian countries from 1980s onward. The team was divided into different sub-groups as the members traveled to 10 Southeast Asian countries to collect information. The obtained data was presented at meetings for the team members to select the artists who would be participating in the show. Sub activities were also held during the data collection process from SEA PROJECT Symposium 01 held under the topic ‘How Has Japan Engaged with Contemporary Art in Southeast Asia?’ in early 2016 to ‘Special Screening: Identity Issues in Singapore and Malaysia Seen through Films’ organized earlier this year.

A COMMISSIONED WORK BY CHAISIRI JIWARANGSAN AND APICHATPONG WEERASETHAKUL

PAINTING WITH HISTORY IN A ROOM FILLED WITH PEOPLE WITH FUNNY NAMES 3, 2015 BY KORAKRIT ARUNANONDCHAI

In the case of Thailand, the curatorial team spent 13 days traveling from Chiang Mai to Bangkok and Ratchaburi, researching, collecting data and meeting with key figures of the country’s art community during the Songkran Festival of 2016. The names of the people the team visited include The Land Foundation run by Rirkrit Tiravanija and Kamin Lertchaiprasert, Navin Rawanchaikul’s StudiOK, Bangkok’s prominent art institutions such as Bangkok Art and Culture Centre, Jim Thompson Art Center and BANGKOK CITYCITY GALLERY all the way to Ratchaburi’s Baan Noorg Collaborative Arts and Culture and the organizer of Art Normal. The visits resulted in the list of 16 Thai artists participating in the event that ranged from veterans such as Chalood Nimsamer, the late Montien Boonma and Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook to the more contemporary generation like Arin Rungjang, Pratchaya Phinthong, Dusadee Huntrakul and Sutthirat Supaparinya to up-and-coming Korakrit Arunanondchai. While most of the works selected were preexisting, the sculpture by Jiwarangsan and Weerasethakul was commissioned specifically for the exhibition. The full list of artists featured in the exhibition and details of the fieldwork are available on SEA PROJECT’s website.

After the survey in 10 Southeast Asian counties and four major meetings, the team divided over 180 artworks from 86 artists into nine different topics; Fluid World, Diverse Identities, Passion and Revolution, Day by Day (the works in this topic deal with the use of everyday life as subject matter for the artists’ artistic creations), Dialogue with History, What is Art? Why Do it? and Medium as Meditation. Instead of categorizing the works based on the artists’ home countries, the use of themes helps to convey a better picture of the region’s characteristics. For example, ‘Diverse Identities’ discusses the marginalization of local identities caused by the emergence of Post-Colonial and Post-World War II geographical borders, which is still a remaining issue in several Southeast Asian countries including the existing patriarchal society reflected from such political and social evolution. Medium as Mediation or What is Art? Why Do It? presents the big picture of the region’s artistic trends. In other words, under these themes, the presentation of the contents of the works can be curated to fall in a line of uniform direction (and be communicated more effectively compared to when a work is exhibited separately). The exhibition transforms the art pieces into historical objects that tell the story of the region’s past and present. The downside, however, is that such compartmentalization can be somewhat too constrained, for it doesn’t allow for the artworks to talk about something else other than the themes that direct them (which is understandable considering curating an exhibition for a museum’s space is required to provide some sort of “answer” for the audience). SUNSHOWER: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now should be able to grant a greater understanding of the region for both the Japanese and Southeast Asian audiences, especially the latter who, despite over five decades of being under the same “ASEAN” umbrella, are still not very aware of the existence or identities of their own neighbor countries.

STORMY WEATHER, 2009/2017 BY FELIX BACOLOR

A TALE OF THE TWO HOME, 2015 BY NAVIN RAWANCHAIKUL

“เราให้ความสนใจกับศิลปะในฝั่งตะวันตกมาสักพักนึงแล้ว และคิดว่ามันถึงเวลาที่เราต้องกลับมามองภูมิภาคใกล้เคียงบ้าง” Fumio Nanjo ไดเร็คเตอร์ของ Mori Art Museum พูดถึงที่มาของ SUNSHOWER: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia 1980s to Now นิทรรศการสเกลใหญ่ที่ใช้พื้นที่ของ Mori Art Museum และ The National Art Center ในโตเกียว เป็นสถานที่จัดงานระหว่างวันที่ 5 กรกฎาคม – 23 ตุลาคม 2017 ชื่อนิทรรศการ Sunshower หมายถึง “ฝนตกแดดออก” โดยสาเหตุที่มันถูกเลือกมาใช้เป็นชื่อนิทรรศการนี้ก็เพราะมันเป็นปรากฏการณ์ที่เกิดขึ้นบ่อยในภูมิภาคที่สภาพอากาศคาดเดาไม่ได้ แปรปรวน และไร้ระเบียบวินัยแบบเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ และชื่อนี้ก็ดูจะเหมาะทีเดียวที่จะเป็นฉากหลังให้กับงานศิลปะหลายๆ ชิ้นในนิทรรศการที่มีภาพลักษณ์แบบร้อนชื้น โดยเฉพาะประติมากรรมรูปช้าง Sunshower, (2017) ของชัยศิริ จิวะรังสรรค์ และ อภิชาติพงศ์ วีระเศรษฐกุล ที่ห้อยอยู่ตรงทางเข้า Mori Art Museum โดยทำหน้าที่แทนเมฆครึ้มส่งเงาทาบทับลงบนพื้นให้ผู้เข้าชมต้องเดินลอดเงาสลัวก่อนเข้านิทรรศการ

ก่อนหน้าจะเป็นนิทรรศการ SUNSHOWER ทีมคิวเรเตอร์ 14 คน (10 คนในจำนวนนั้นเป็นคนญี่ปุ่น) ที่เป็นการรวมทีมคิวเรเตอร์จากสององค์กรคือ Mori Art Museum และ The National Art Center Tokyo กับคิวเรเตอร์ชาวเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ Vera Mey หนึ่งในผู้ร่วมก่อตั้ง SOUTHEAST OF NOW จากสิงคโปร์ Grace Samboh คิวเรเตอร์ชาวอินโดนีเซีย Ong Jo-Lene และ Merv Espina ศิลปินและคิวเรเตอร์อิสระ ใช้เวลากว่า 2 ปีครึ่งทำงานวิจัยโครงการ SEA PROJECT ซึ่งเป็นการศึกษาที่ว่าด้วยศิลปะในกลุ่มประเทศเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ตั้งแต่ช่วง 1980s เป็นต้นมา พวกเขาใช้วิธีการแบ่งทีมลงไปสำรวจเก็บข้อมูลเกี่ยวกับศิลปะใน 10 ประเทศ สลับกับนำข้อมูลกลับมาประชุมเพื่อคัดเลือกศิลปิน รวมไปถึงจัดกิจกรรมย่อยระหว่างกระบวนการเก็บข้อมูลที่ว่านี้ เช่น SEA PROJECT Symposium 01 ในหัวข้อ ‘How has Japan engaged with Contemporary Art in Southeast Asia?’ ในช่วงต้นปี 2016 หรือ กิจกรรมฉายภาพยนตร์ว่าด้วยอัตลักษณ์ที่แตกต่างของสองชนชาติอย่าง Special Screening: Identity Issues in Singapore and Malaysia Seen Through Films ในช่วงต้นปีที่ผ่านมา

ในกรณีของประเทศไทย ทีมคิวเรเตอร์ใช้เวลาเก็บข้อมูลและเข้าพบ บุคคลสำคัญๆ ในวงการศิลปะไทยทั้งหมด 13 วันช่วงสงกรานต์ปี 2016 โดยตระเวนไปทั่วประเทศตั้งแต่เชียงใหม่ กรุงเทพฯ ไปจนถึงราชบุรี ชนิดที่ไม่ตกหล่นอะไรไปเลย รายชื่อคนที่ทีมคิวเรเตอร์ได้พูดคุยด้วยมีตั้งแต่ The Land Foundation ของฤกษ์ฤทธิ์ ตีระวนิช และคามิน เลิศชัยประเสริฐ สตูดิโอเคของนาวิน ลาวัลย์ชัยกุล องค์กรศิลปะขนาดใหญ่ในกรุงเทพฯ อย่าง หอศิลปวัฒนธรรมแห่งกรุงเทพมหานคร หอศิลป์บ้านจิมทอมป์สัน หอศิลป์มหาวิทยาลัยกรุงเทพ และ BANGKOK CITYCITY GALLERY หรือในราชบุรี อย่าง Baan Noorg Collaborative Arts and Culture และคณะผู้จัดงานปกติศิลป์ (Art Normal) ครั้งที่ผ่านมาก่อนจะสรุปมาเป็นรายชื่อศิลปินไทยที่ได้มีส่วนร่วมในนิทรรศการนี้ทั้งหมด 16 คน ไล่มาตั้งแต่ ชลูด นิ่มเสมอ มณเฑียร บุญมา อารยา ราษฎร์จำเริญสุข มาจนถึงรุ่นร่วมสมัยมากขึ้นอย่าง อริญชย์ รุ่งแจ้ง ปรัชญา พิณทอง ดุษฎี ฮันตระกูล สุทธิรัตน์ ศุภปริญญา และศิลปินรุ่นใหม่ที่กำลังโด่งดังอยู่ในตอนนี้อย่าง กรกฤต อรุณานนท์ชัย การเลือกผลงานส่วนใหญ่จะเป็นการคัดเลือกผลงานชิ้นก่อนๆ ไปจัดแสดง จะมีก็แต่ประติมากรรมของชัยศิริและอภิชาติพงศ์ ที่เป็นงานคอมมิชชั่นที่ทำขึ้นเพื่อนิทรรศการนี้โดยเฉพาะ สำหรับรายชื่อศิลปินชาติอื่นๆ และรายละเอียดของการลงพื้นที่สำรวจเก็บข้อมูลนั้น สามารถเข้าไปอ่านกันได้ในเว็บไซต์ของ SEA PROJECT

หลังจากการลงพื้นที่จนครบ 10 ประเทศ และประชุมกัน 4 ครั้งใหญ่ๆ ทีมงานก็แบ่งงานศิลปะกว่า 180 ผลงาน จากศิลปิน 86 คนออกเป็น 9 หัวข้อคือ Fluid World, Diverse Identities, Passion and Revolution, Day by Day (ว่าด้วยงานศิลปะที่เอาชีวิตประจำวันมาทำงานศิลปะ) Archiving, Growth and Loss (ศิลปะที่พูดถึงการพัฒนาที่หลั่งไหลเข้ามาในภูมิภาค พร้อมๆ กับความสูญเสีย) Dialogue with History, What is Art? Why Do it? และ Medium as Meditation แทนที่จะแบ่งตามเขตแดนประเทศ การแบ่งธีมแบบนี้ช่วยเน้นให้ความเป็นภูมิภาคของเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ชัดเจนยิ่งขึ้นกว่าเดิม หัวข้ออย่าง Diverse Indentities ช่วยพูดถึงปัญหาที่เกิดขึ้นมาตลอดในหลายๆ ประเทศ ที่เขตแดนที่ขีดขึ้นหลังยุคล่าอาณานิคมและสงครามโลกครั้งที่ 2 ทำให้อัตลักษณ์ใดอัตลักษณ์หนึ่งในพื้นที่เดิมกลายเป็นอัตลักษณ์ชายขอบและสะท้อนให้เห็นวัฒนธรรมชายเป็นใหญ่ที่ยังคงปรากฏให้เห็นอยู่ในภูมิภาคจนถึงตอนนี้ หรือในแง่การสร้างงานศิลปะอย่างหัวข้อ Medium as Meditation หรือ What is Art? Why do it? ที่จะให้ภาพกว้างๆ ของเทรนด์การทำงานศิลปะในภูมิภาค พูดในอีกทำนองหนึ่งคือ การเกลี่ยงานศิลปะไปตามธีมที่ตั้งขึ้นมานี้น่าจะช่วยควบคุมเนื้อหาของงานศิลปะแต่ละชิ้นให้ชัดเจนมากกว่าเดิม (มากกว่าตอนที่มันถูกจัดแสดงเดี่ยวๆ) และเป็นการเปลี่ยนให้ศิลปะกลายเป็นวัตถุทางประวัติศาสตร์ที่บอกเล่าความเป็นมา / ความเป็นไปในภูมิภาคได้เป็นอย่างดี แต่ถ้าจะพูดถึงข้อเสียก็คงเป็นในแง่ที่ว่า การจัดลงกล่องดูจะเป็นวิธีที่แข็งไปเสียหน่อยสำหรับงานศิลปะ เพราะมันไม่เปิดโอกาสให้ชิ้นงานพูดเรื่องที่นอกเหนือไปจากธีมที่คลุมมันไว้ (ซึ่งก็เป็นที่เข้าใจได้ ว่าการคิวเรตงานในพื้นที่อย่างพิพิธภัณฑ์นั้นจำเป็นต้องให้ “คำตอบ” อะไรบางอย่างแก่ผู้ชมได้บ้าง) นิทรรศการ SUNSHOWER: Contemporary Art from SoutheastAsia 1980s to Now น่าจะทำให้คนญี่ปุ่นเข้าใจความเป็นเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ได้มากขึ้น เช่นเดียวกับผู้ชมชาวเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ที่บางครั้งการอาศัยอยู่ในภูมิภาคเดียวกัน อยู่ภายใต้ร่มของสมาคมประชาชาติแห่งเอเชียตะวันออกเฉียงใต้ มามากว่า 50 ปี กลับไม่ได้ช่วยให้เราเห็นการมีตัวตนของประเทศเพื่อนบ้านมากเท่าที่ควร

TEXT: NAPAT CHARITBUTRA
PHOTO COURTESY OF MORI ART MUSEUM
sunshower2017.jp

Leave a Reply